LS & T – (62 – 75)

62. The inception of the socialist/communist ideology, sometimes using idealistic democracy as a stepping stone, has provided those who lust for power over others with an almost hypnotic conveyance to that goal.

63. The methods of attaining that goal have sometimes been insidious gradualism and sometimes direct violence.

64. Power once thus gained and subsequently threatened is most often maintained by the use of extreme suppression.

65. Perhaps the earliest example of that suppression was exhibited in the origins of the French revolution during the late 1700’s. The planners used the noble philosophy of “The Rights of Man” to gain mass support for the over throw of the monarchy and, once some supporters balked, the public use of the guillotine tended to moderate their protests. History continued to reveal that pattern in Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union, Red China, Vietnam, Cambodia, Cuba and others.

66. At the core of establishing these types of governments, either gradually or violently, is the importance of recruiting an “army” of devoted followers.

67.Hitler described that his method of organizing was learned from the Marxists. The modus operandi was the delivery of propaganda directed toward the emotions of the masses and very little to their intellectual logic. He found this to be so successful that he was able to get his followers to participate in, or acquiesce to, killing other German citizens as well as stealing and destroying their property. Google …. “Kristallnacht”.

68. The Great Terror of the Soviets, the slaughter of protesting students in China’s Tian’anmen Square and the Killing Fields of Cambodia are examples sufficient enough to illustrate the dangers of the hollow and treacherous promises of economic, social and political equality proclaimed by socialist/communist organizers and planners.

69. In spite of the clearly expressed socialist/communist intentions and maneuvers to overthrow the government of the U.S.A., most people of the U.S. have remained oblivious to the threat. Some have even been complicit in the advancement of those goals.

70. This has only been possible because those who have controlled the systems of education have failed to stress (or chose to omit) information regarding the dangers of those ideologies and the historical uniqueness of the American form of government.

71. Even though communist intentions had been laid out for 100 years, Americans who called attention to the presence of socialist/communist influences on college campuses in the 1950’s & 60’s were ridiculed and lampooned.

72. Records now reveal that foreign students eventually began returning to their home countries with the newly fashionable Marxism that they found on American campuses.

73. For a significant period of time, the presence of Marxist professors at some colleges has been common knowledge among the students.

74. This has been confirmed by no less authority than former President Barack Obama. In his memoir, Dreams from My Father, he shared how he had carefully chosen Marxist professors while attending college.

75. There is no way to determine the number of Americans who have been indoctrinated by those learned instructors over the past seventy or eighty years.

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L S & T – (46 – 61)

  1. In giving thought to the several countries that have embraced socialistic or communistic forms of government, we see that none are exactly alike.
  2. Although theoretical proponents of the two philosophies may claim certain differences, both insist that personal property rights must be abolished or severely regulated by a central authority.
  3. Both also require central planning for the normal course of events such as education and the economy.
  4. Provoking resentments of economic and societal differences and using emotional rallying cries for “Equality!” have always been among the modi operandi of the organizers who have established those forms of government.
  5. One historical commonality of those forms of government is that oft times the leaders came to power and maintained it by the use of violence.
  6. This was true in the cases of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. The Nazis raised the socialist banner (National Socialist German Workers Party) championed by Adolf Hitler, while the Soviets (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) embraced communism that was based on the philosophy developed by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels with the implementation being effected at the hands of Vladimir Lenin and Joseph Stalin.
  7. Aside from Hitler’s rage for racial “purity”, his great quarrel with Stalin was not so much political philosophy as it was about which of the two would dominate Europe and eventually a major portion of the world.
  8. In 1847 Engels developed the Principles of Communism. Therein he noted that communism must become a worldwide movement, and the first assembly for those who were interested convened in 1864.
  9. Engels expounded that communism was the struggle (remember that word) between workers who owned no property (the proletariat) and those people who were capitalistic property owners (the bourgeoisie… pronounced sorta like… “boor-zwa-zee”).
  10. A major factor in converting other countries to communism would require that they have a democratic constitution.
  11. Even though the constitutional government of America had existed less than sixty years, Engels thought it important enough give that country special attention.
  12. He mistakenly believed a democratic constitution had already been established, and openly informed America, and all who would inquire, that communist intentions would be to make common cause with the party that would turn that constitution against the bourgeoisie.
  13. In all cases where possible, the communists would make common cause with “democratic socialists” and various other democratic parties depending upon how closely their socialistic measures approached the aims of communism.
  14. Two objectives of the implementation of communism would be ending the practices of traditional marriage and religion.
  15. Engels even provided some of the main measures in establishing communism.

…. Graduated taxation (Like our income tax – 1913)

…. Heavy inheritance tax (Like our estate tax – 1916)

…. Control of money through a national bank (Forms have existed since the 1790s, but a         major move was taken with the establishment of the “FED” – 1913)

…. Construction of national housing at national cost (Similarities found in HUD – 1965)

…. Education of all children in national establishments at national cost. (Control beginning with the slow, 1867-1979, development of the Dept. of Education and continuing with views now expressed by Bernie Sanders – 2016)

61. Engels admits the impossibility of achieving the goals of his Principles all at once, but insisted that one would bring others in its wake with gradual implementation being preferred, but measures of violence would be supported if necessary.

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Last Sharing & Testament – (29 – 45)

Bye and bye, readers will understand the concern about this topic. It is not just a matter of semantics.

  1. (29) Information we receive is the preponderant factor in guiding our beliefs, emotions and actions.
  2. (30) Aside from anecdotal personal experiences, written and spoken words are the chief transmitters of information. We receive those words from schools, media, individuals and various books and records.
  3. (31) Unfortunately for the current generation of Americans, notable amounts of authentic information has been omitted or obfuscated while significant false information has become ingrained in our beliefs.
  4. (32) One such fallacy is that our form of government is a “democracy”.
  5. (33) “Democracy” is not found in the U.S. Constitution. That form of government was not suggested by any member of the Constitutional Convention.
  6. (34) During three plus months, working six days a week, the learned framers had examined the history of all known forms of ancient and then current governments. To the founders,“Democracy” was somewhat of a curse word.
  7. (35) James Madison, acknowledged as the Chief Architect of the Constitution, described democracies: “…. such democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or rights of property”.
  8. (36) During the ratification debates, Fisher Ames (enrolled in Harvard at age 12, graduated at 16) opined, “A democracy is a volcano which conceals the fiery elements of its own destruction”.
  9. (37) In short, an appropriate description of a democracy is the old expression, “two wolves and a sheep voting to decide what they will eat for dinner”.
  10. (38) In spite of these truths, the general public, educators, legislators, foreign entities and even some of our presidents have extolled our “democratic constitution”. This is undoubtedly attributable to #31.
  11. (39) What was established by our constitution was a republican form of government, and the federal government is constitutionally required to guarantee such a form to every state in the union.
  12. (40) The structure of our government sought to inhibit the evils of two extremes, those being ……. (a) autocratic rule of a few people over all people and….. (b) mob rule over the lesser number.
  13. (41) In a nut shell, our government was formed as follows:
  14. (42) The House of Representatives is designed to represent the “democratic” voice of the people because each member is elected by, and therefore responsible to, the people of that district.
  15. (43) The Senate was to represent the interests of the state governments by being appointed through the state legislatures, whose members were to be elected by the people of each state. Unfortunately, that was changed by the 17th Amendment… We will address that later.
  16. (44) The president is elected by a combination of voices of the people and the interests of the states. Specifically, each state is apportioned a number of ballots equal to the total number of their members of Congress. This reduces the effect of a few populous states dominating the many.
  17. (45) All of this has been offered in preparation for what is next to be shared…. It will be more than a little significant regarding the current (September, 2017) state of the U.S.A.
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Last Sharing and Testament – (21 – 28)

Please disregard the uninvited corrections that WordPress chooses to make on my posts. The proper numerical designations of the successive items will be identified in parentheses….. The intention is to extend this post into hundreds of items.

 

 

    1. (21) Let it be noted for any future reference that the word “ignorance” has a basic definition of lacking information…. “stupidity” pertains to actions or decisions. I am personally ignorant of the interpretation of sheet music. I am not stupid enough to demonstrate that ignorance at a piano recital.
    2. (22) To avoid a public display of ignorance, it may be best to know the meanings of our words.
    3. (23) For example, there may be a problem with the use of a word that seems to be currently popular with demonstrators and their organizers. The use of that word may be due to the ignorance of some or the intent to inflame emotions by others.
    4. (24) That word is “Nazi”.
    5. (25) Nazi – a member of the National Socialist German Workers’ party or an adherent of a party or movement similar to that of the Nazis.
    6. (26) Nazism – the body of political and economic doctrines of the National Socialist German Workers’ party … including the totalitarian principle of government, state control of all industry and predominance of groups assumed to be racially superior.
    7. (27) If an ignorant person wished to reveal his condition by selecting only his desired portion of the definition, he could label Bernie Sanders and Abraham Lincoln as Nazis.
    8. (28) There does seem to be a number of people who use a Saul Alinsky (we’ll deal with him more extensively in a future sharing) tactic of inciting emotions by encouraging the use of the word, “Nazi”.
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Last Sharing and Testament (9 – 20)

After the original posting of this blog, I see that the very helpful folks at wordpress  decided I had made a mistake and corrected my enumeration beginning with Number 9 and replaced my numerals (9 – 20) with letters — Don’t know what I can do to correct this, but I’m trying …….. THANKS, WORDPRESS!  – – – – – – –  Well, looks like  I can’t correct it…. Don’t know what they will do when I get to number 27… (Maybe I found a solution)

This is the third of a continuation of the henceforward format of this blog.

    1. (9) In order to properly communicate with others, the meanings of words become of signal importance. That word “signal”, for example may be used as a noun, verb or adjective. In this case it is used as an adjective modifying “importance” to the effect that it means “outstanding” importance. Thus it would be worthwhile for us to examine the understanding of a few words in the context of some of today’s contentions (not intended to include all extended meanings).
    2. (10) Prejudice – an irrational attitude of hostility directed against an individual, group, race or supposed characteristics.
    3. (11) Bigot – one who is obstinately and irrationally, often intolerantly, devoted to his own church, party, belief or opinion.
    4. (12) Racist – One who assumes that psychocultural traits and capacities are determined by biological race, and that races differ decisively from one another which is usually coupled with a belief in the inherent superiority of a particular race.
    5. (13) Testament – (Some may have wondered about the meaning and intent of that word) One definition is tangible proof, evidence. Another is an expression of conviction. Both will be exercised in what I have chosen to call a Last Sharing and & Testament.
    6. (14)We will now engage in an activity involving one or more of the preceding definitions. Those who have read some of these previous ramblings will have an idea where we are headed here.
    7. (15) Considering the definitions above, what would be your judgment of a person who made the following very public and emphatic statements of belief?
    8. (16) The white race should always be given the superior societal position above the black. Blacks should not be allowed to hold public office. They should not be allowed to serve on juries. They should not be allowed to intermarry with whites, and they should not be allowed to vote. They should be returned to the homeland of their ancestry, but that solution is impractical.
    9. (17) If you logically conclude that the statements in number 16 fit one or more of the definitions, you have just described Honest Abe, two years before he became president. The complete transcript of his remarks was really more revealing than the need for brevity will bear.
    10. (18) All of this is shared, not to promote any kind of emotional response, but to begin the task of demonstrating the failures (or worse, manipulations) of our education systems.
    11. (19) We do not need to tear down the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C., attack people who would protect the monument, parade in the streets, burn and loot buildings or block traffic.
    12. (20) A lot more sharing of truth is yet to come… not just in this domain … so, relax… take a deep breath… and remember… what “was”… was.  And press on to use truth to make what “is”… better.
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Last S & T – Bibliography + 1 – 8

Bibliography of Last Sharing and Testament

Webster’s Third New International Dictionary of the English Language

Webster’s 1828 Online Dictionary

The Avalon Project – Lillian Goldman Library Yale Law School

Articles of Confederation of the United States of America

Constitution of the Confederate States of America

Constitution of the United States of America

Declaration of Independence of the United States of America

The Red Flag A History of Communism – David Priestland

The Principles of Communism – Fredrick Engels

The Federalist Papers – James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay

A History of the English Speaking People – (First Four Volumes) Winston Churchill

In the Shadow of the Sword – Tom Holland

Rules of Radicals – Saul Alinsky

The Living Lincoln The man and his times in his own words – Angle & Miers

James Madison – Lynne Cheney

Mien Kampf – Adolf Hitler

Democracy in America – Alexis de Tocqueville

The Truth About Muhammad – Robert Spencer

1000 Years for Revenge – Peter Lance

The Templars and the Assassins – James Wasserman

Crisis in Secondary Education – B. Frank Brown

Empire of the Summer Moon – S. C. Gwynne

Dreams from My Father – Barrack Obama

The Audacity of Hope – Barrack Obama

Founding Mothers – Cokie Roberts

Ratification – Pauline Maier

A Peoples History of the United States – Howard Zinn

The Years of Lyndon Johnson, Means of Ascent – Robert Caro

Aztec & Maya – Charles Phillips

Slavery by Another Name – Douglas A. Blackmon

The Road to Serfdom – Friedrich Hayck

Discovering God – Rodney Stark

From Colony to Superpower U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1776 – (edited by) George C. Herring

Information shared from any of these sources will not necessarily be so noted because this Last Sharing and Testament is not a book… It’s a blog. If information that did not come from some of these sources is shared, I will endeavor to indicate.

Reemphasizing, the main purpose of this effort is to encourage people to take a deep breath — allow emotions to coast in neutral —- be willing to accept truth that seems sometimes good and sometimes bad — realize the finality of what “was” … was — Then use that knowledge of the truth to help make what “is” … better.

Let’s begin the sharing with something that should be very simple and related to one of the contentions of current times.

  1. There was once a war in North America between twenty three states (eventually twenty six by the conclusion of the war) versus eleven states. The war lasted about four years.
  2. We have been taught to call this war the Civil War. It was not. It was no more a civil war than the one that officially began in 1776.
  3. A civil war is waged between two factions to determine which will control a single government. Robert E. Lee no more wanted to set up his government in Washington than George Washington wished to establish a government in London.
  4. A more appropriate term might be the War for Southern Independence.
  5. The twenty six United States won. That’s truthful history.
  6. This twisting of terminology may have had an insidious origin, or it may have just been a careless application of semantics. Other than possibly creating some kind of subliminal basis for a false narrative … Big Whoop… “no big deal”.
  7. However, there are other areas where our lack of knowledge of accurate understanding of words is very dangerous.
  8. We’ll deal with some examples of that later, but I do reserve the privilege of returning to the time period of this topic.
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Last Sharing and Testament – Preamble

The ground I’m going to plow here in the next several days (if the Lord be so willing) is based on love… love of my children…. grands and great grands… and all other relatives … my friends (of all sizes, shapes and colors)… and my country.

Before some readers get their panties in a wad, a bit of personal stuff needs to be set straight.

Born in the 1930s.

Early elementary age, was aware of segregated society but didn’t know why. Gave it little thought.

About that time, saw an adult throw a stick of wood into the windshield of some black folks. Didn’t know why & was a little scared.

Early teen years, we built a ball field in a pasture. Some black kids showed up & we played. After a couple of times they didn’t show up any more. Didn’t know why, cause it had been ok with me.

Summer before senior year, had part time job working for a building contractor. Most of the men were black. Ok w/me. We unloaded cement sacks from box cars & shoveled sand and gravel into the mixer. Drank cold water from the lid of the cooler with the black guys. Ok with me. Just a minor thought, don’t recall an F bomb coming from any of them.

Fast forward to coaching career and the time of early integration. Some guys came from Lincoln during the “freedom of choice” period & all were good kids. The spring before total integration was going into effect, a plan of mine designed to lessen any kind of culture shock caused a problem. The black coach, who had become a friend, and I had our track teams work out together one time. That was ok. I later invited the athletes at Lincoln to go through a little off season routine. They did and that seemed ok.

But then I got too bold. Since (with me) spiritual things occupy a higher plateau than the natural things, I thought it would be a good idea if I invited members (black & white) of our track team to join me in visiting white and black churches on alternate Sunday’s. Some did and that… didn’t… seem ok. I will conclude this ramble by only sharing that (with all love, respect & understanding for the people involved), my judgment of the situation made it best that I seek other employment.

All of that has been said to say this: On future dates I intend to post a “Last Sharing and Testament” of information, the omission and obfuscation of which (it is my assessment) has brought us to the sad state of affairs we are now witnessing…… And I will not respond to any remarks about an old man in fear of losing his “white privilege”.

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